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Celebrations, June 17

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Currituck County Cooperative Extension administrative assistant Sherry Lynn (left) has won the Northeast District Administrative Professional of the Year Award for 2017. She is shown with Joy Pierce, Office Assistant for the Martin County Cooperative Extension.

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Sunday, June 17, 2018

Lynn wins ‘Professional of the Year’ Award

Sherry Lynn, administrative assistant for Currituck County Cooperative Extension, has been awarded the Northeast District Administrative Professional of the Year Award for 2017, the Cooperative announced.

The award was presented at the N.C. Cooperative Extension Administrative Professionals Association — Northeast District Spring meeting held in Columbia.

Lynn is in her 10th year of service with Cooperative Extension in Currituck County.

Cameron Lowe, County Extension Director, said, “She is truly dedicated to her profession. Sherry has excelled locally and is always seeking opportunities to share best practices she has developed with others in the profession to advance our entire organization.”

Lynn was nominated for the award by her colleagues in Currituck County Extension, and was selected the winner of the Northeast District, which is comprised of 22 counties. This award was designed to recognize outstanding performance as well as acknowledge involvement in and significant contributions to the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Administrative Professionals Association.

She has been a contributing member of her association throughout her career with Cooperative Extension. She has held roles on the district and state level and currently serves as her association’s officer representative to the North Carolina Federation of Cooperative Extension Associations.

E.C. Rotary Club awards students in contest

Mattilyn McNeil, a student at the Northeast Academy for Aerospace and Advanced Technologies (NEAAT), won first place in the Elizabeth City Rotary Club's Four -Way Test Essay Contest. McNeil is the daughter of Jennifer and Carey McNeil of Elizabeth City.

NEAAT classmate Jordan M. Barton was the runnerup. Barton is from Edenton. Their teacher/coaches are Debra Rook and Tonya Little.

Kennedy Worrell of Elizabeth City Middle School took third place. Her father, T.J. Worrell, is principal of ECMS.

The students received cash awards.

The 28 words of the Four-Way Test have been a guide for Rotary International since shortly after its formation in 1905. They are:

"Is it the truth?

Is it fair to all concerned?

Will it build good will and better friendships?

Will it be beneficial to all concerned?"

Jordan, Abrams on JMU academics lists

Currituck resident Rachel M. Jordan has been named to the president's list, and Ashley L. Abrams of Moyock has been named to the dean's list at James Madison University for the spring 2018 semester, the university announced.

Students who earn president's list honors must carry at least 12 graded credit hours and earn a GPA of 3.900 or above. Jordan is majoring in Architectural Design.

Students who earn dean's list honors must carry at least 12 graded credit hours and earn a GPA of between 3.5 and 3.899. Abrams is majoring in Psychology.

Shannon awarded Callaway Memorial Scholarship

Lauren Shannon, daughter of Ed and Renee Shannon, was awarded the first Scott C. Callaway Memorial Scholarship.

An NHS graduate, she will attend ECU and major in instrumental music. Her goal is to be a band director in eastern North Carolina. Call Tim Aydlett at 252-335-0079 for more information on the scholarship.

Courtney graduates from Davenport U.

Stacy Courtney of Elizabeth City graduated from Davenport University this spring, the university announced.

Davenport is a private, non-profit university serving about 7,500 students at campuses across Michigan and online. 

Lions, TowneBank fund grants for Camden students

The Camden Lions Club and TowneBank have ​funded teacher-requested mini-grants that support local education in Camden County, the Camden County Education Foundation announced.

Townbank funded a grant entitled “​Hands and Eyes on Science​” for 150 fifth-graders

Through the grant, each student gets a “hands on” to help them understand food chains and webs, the Foundation said. “It will create a visual understanding of why certain species are dependent on one another. It will also open up dialogue to understand what happens if certain species are removed from a habitat. This will be available year after year to assist upcoming 5th-graders in the Science/Social Studies.”

The Foundation also announced that the Lions Club ​funded a teacher-requested mini-grant entitled “​Literature Circles​” for 160 4th-graders which will increase their reading fluency and comprehension. These books will be available year after year to assist upcoming 4th-graders in the Language Arts education.

COA students take part in Splash Week

College of The Albemarle’s professional crafts past and current jewelry students made a lasting impression at Splash Week in Elizabeth City this month.

“This has been a great opportunity for current and past students to share their talent with the community by displaying and selling their artwork. It is beautiful to see all their work together in one place, as well as the many diverse styles,” said, Kathryn Osgood, COA Associate Professor for Professional Crafts: Jewelry.

COA featured several students including: Lou Sanderlin, Suzzette Holmes, Emily Holmes, Annemarie Pomp, Dorothy Ansell, Mark Slagle, Vickie Kittrell, Deloris Samuelson, Bettie Lowe, Amy Wood, Lisa LeMair, Kathryn Osgood, Kitty Dough, Connie May, Cammie Hall and Alison Williams

Student Dorthy Ansell gave a live demonstration on cold connections and walked through the process of transforming a beverage can into a pair of earrings with only nail sets, beach block, clippers, hammer and a metal hole punch.

Alcock, Benton are LGFCU scholars 

Kaitlin Alcock and Evelyn Benton, Elizabeth City employees, are the recipients of a Professional Development Scholarship through the University of N.C. School of Government, the Local Government Federal Credit Union announced.

Alcock and Benton are the recipients of career development scholarship awards. Alcock will attend the course Zoning Certification and Benton will attend the course Governmental Accounting and Financial Reporting at the SOG at UNC-Chapel Hill.

“The credit union is proud to partner with the School of Government to offer these scholarships to North Carolina’s local government employees,” said LGFCU President Maurice Smith. “As a result, these LGFCU members are able to strengthen their skills and enhance their job performance, thereby better serving their communities.”

Smith joins Elizabeth City Morning Rotary Club

The Elizabeth City Morning Rotary Club recently inducted Dan Smith as a new member.

Dan is the Director of Marketing and Communications at Mid-Atlantic Christian University. His sponsor is Fred Womble, Club President. 

As a new member Dan will be part of the Rotary family and provide service to our local communities in a variety of projects and programs as he will serve on one or more Elizabeth City Morning Rotary committees. Rotary’s motto is “Service Above Self”.

COA hosts meeting on rural healthcare

College of The Albemarle hosted the North Carolina Office of Rural Health on June 5 to discuss availability of healthcare services, grant opportunities and concerns facing northeast North Carolina.

“Our northeast region of the state has unique strengths, as well as concerns, in providing healthcare services and education for health careers in our area, especially related to our rural and socioeconomic make-up and close proximity to the larger Virginia urban health market,” said Robin Harris, Dean of Health Sciences and Wellness programs at COA . “Being able to understand some of the resources available to us through the State Office of Rural Health, as well as communicating some of the challenges we face in healthcare as a region, was a positive step in getting our concerns and needs known to policy makers.

“I was glad we were able to emphasize our need for support at the state level for using our limited rural resources wisely through collaboration across the region,” Harris said. 

 

 

 

 

 

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